Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
August 3, 2013
Image Size
1.9 MB
Resolution
2167×1357
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
7,456 (11 today)
Favourites
127 (who?)
Comments
11
Downloads
82
×
Object FFE3A2 by Hoborginc Object FFE3A2 by Hoborginc
A prototype for an adaptable platform.

It's chambered in a proprietary short cartridge, with identical dimensions to 7.62x39, except for case length.

There are two magazine releases because the receiver is designed to be used with 7.62x39, but is currently configured to function as an SMG/PDW.

The dual ejection ports and top-mounted charging handle mean that the receiver is open on three sides. However, sides of the bolt extend far enough to completely cover the large ejection ports when it's closed, and the charging handle is mounted on a box-like structure, covering half of the top opening. The rear half of the top opening is covered by a sleeve that's part of the upper receiver.

To open the receiver, it is necessary to remove the pin at the back, which holds three things together: the upper receiver, the lower receiver, and the recoil spring guide. Once the receiver is open, take out the recoil spring guide and the recoil spring. To take out the bolt carrier, first unscrew the charging handles and remove them. Then, the bolt can easily be taken out.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconketerclass:
KeterClass Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
This looks like the scorpion EVO from black ops 2. (Not a gamer, just know my guns) :D
Reply
:icongaofendineng:
gaofendineng Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2013
Reminds me of the Skorpion EVO. 
Reply
:iconbreenbeans:
BreenBeans Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I love the flash muzzle!  So unique!
Reply
:iconlmr54:
lmr54 Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
So, a few questions come to mind. The first is, by open on both sides, you mean that it can eject on either side? That's normally not a huge issue unless it's a bullpup. Second, it shares bullet dimension with 7.62x39? Judging by the magazine size, you wouldn't have much room with that bullet in there. 
Reply
:iconhoborginc:
Hoborginc Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2013
The ejection ports are symmetrical. Yes, if you replace the bolt, you can change the direction of ejection. You're right in that it's not necessarily vital, but it does offer some added flexibility. Also, it improves airflow and allows the user to see into the chamber without tilting the weapon. Does it allow dirt to get in? Probably, but it also allows dirt to get out, and with a long-stroke sysyem that shouldn't be much of an issue.

The bullet diameter, neck angle, and case diameter are the same. The bullet and casing are both shorter. The rim diameter is slightly smaller, simply because of the way the casing is tapered.
The experiment is simply to have a rifle that can be converted into a submachine gun. The barrels are identical, except for chamber length.
Reply
:iconlmr54:
lmr54 Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Ah yes, so it's something like the VZ 58? Only, with a framework still?
Reply
:iconhoborginc:
Hoborginc Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2013
Yes, but with a long-stroke instead of a short-stroke piston.
Reply
:iconlmr54:
lmr54 Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
That'd improve the reliability a great deal. So in order to swap out the ammunition, you'd have to adjust the headspace and insert a new magazine adapter?
Reply
:iconhoborginc:
Hoborginc Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2013
Also switch out the bolt and barrel.

My original idea was to have a chamber adapter: a block with a hole of the correct diameter, which could be locked in place to extend the length of the chamber by 11mm or so, to accommodate the rifle cartridge. This was the reason for the special submachine gun cartridge and making it similar.

The problem, however, would be that the seam between the original chamber and the adapter might cause problems. Especially if the chamber was worn down over time, a slight gap would develop, which might cause failures to extract if a fired casing expands into that gap. To avoid this, the user would have to use only steel-cased ammo.

So, it may be preferable just to have a whole new barrel for the rifle. While this reduces the importance of identical chamber dimensions, keeping them similar simplifies the barrel manufacturing process. Then again, manufacturing a new barrel is easier than developing a new cartridge. As such, it'll probably be better to switch the submachine gun to an established cartridge like 7.62x25 Tokarev.
Reply
:iconlmr54:
lmr54 Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I'd agree with the established cartridge, and 7.62x25 is a very good choice. It needs to make a comeback. 

Now, provided the barrel is built to the right tolerances, I don't see why you'd have to change it. Seems the headspace would be the problem. 

Unfortunately, the steel-cased ammunition is a recipe for disaster. The French have chronic issues with ammunition compatibility for their FAMAS, and they're looking for a replacement now. It really defeats the purpose of standardized ammunition. So, if the ammo has to be steel-cased, then proprietary rounds would be essential. 

The best thing to do in all likelihood is just have an upper receiver that's modular.
Reply
Add a Comment: